American Indian Center

In 2011, at the request of the Chancellor’s Office of External Relations, the American Indian Center was launched. The goal of the American Indian Center (AIC) at CSUDH is to increase the number of students from Tribal Nations who enroll and graduate from the CSU. The American Indian Center provides support and builds a college culture among Native American families. AIC also presents a series of experiential educational initiatives throughout the year to promote better understanding of indigenous cultures across the campus and in our communities, as well as providing experiential learning opportunities for our students.

Directors:


"Going Home"

This engaging short video details the return of a herd of bison to the Lakota Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota.

  

RETHINKING THANKSGIVING: THE 400TH ANNIVERSARY OF THANKSGIVING

Rethinking Thanksgiving Part 1

by:,,Reporter & Producer,Producer Jacob Mermell,Photographer, Editor & Co-Producer Bob Keet
Posted: Nov 8, 2021 / 09:48 AM PST Updated: Nov 9, 2021 / 01:07 AM PST
Gayle Anderson began part one of a four-part series observing the 400th Anniversary of Thanksgiving and Rethinking Thanksgiving. The rethinking takes us to Native Americans on the California coast and their perspective of Thanksgiving. Today, Gayle started with the story of the Chumash, whose homeland included the coast of California between Malibu and Paso Robles as well as the Northern Channel Islands.
Gayle takes us to the Chumash Indian Museum, 3290 Lang Ranch Parkway, Thousand Oaks, CA 91362. The museum is open Saturdays and Sundays in accordance with COVID-19 safety guidelines.
Visit the museum’s website for more information.
According to the museum’s website: “…The Chumash Indian Museum is a historical site and living history center. This museum is dedicated to restoring and preserving an awareness of the Chumash people and their historical, cultural, material and present-day influence, as well as the natural environment and historical significance of this site. Through exhibits, events, and educational programs, the Chumash Indian Museum serves as a gathering place for a partnership with the native and non-native communities connecting the past with the present to continue the shared future…”

Rethinking Thanksgiving Part 2

by:,Reporter & Producer,Producer Jacob Mermell,Photographer, Editor & Co-Producer Bob Keet ,
Posted: Nov 9, 2021 / 09:03 AM PSTUpdated: Nov 9, 2021 / 09:03 AM PST
Gayle Anderson continues the four-part series observing the 400th Anniversary of Thanksgiving and Rethinking Thanksgiving. The rethinking takes us to Native Americans on the California coast and their perspective of Thanksgiving.
Today, we learn the story of the Tongva people, whose homeland was most of the Los Angeles Basin and more. Gayle takes us to the newAcademy Museum of Motion Pictures, 6067 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California, 90036.
The new museum opened in September acknowledging and dedicating the location to the Tongva people, who were the original residents of the Mid-Wilshire location. The blessing was presented by Tongva Spiritual Leader and Cultural Consultant James (Jimi) Castillo.

Rethinking Thanksgiving Part 3

by:,Reporter & Producer ,Jacob Mermell Producer ,Photographer, Editor, & Co-Producer Bob Keet
Posted: Nov 11, 2021 / 04:16 AM PSTUpdated: Nov 18, 2021 / 02:24 PM PST
Gayle Anderson continues our four part series observing the 400th ANNIVERSARY OF THANKSGIVING AND RETHINKING THANKSGIVING IN NOVEMBER: NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH – THE GABRIELINO-TONGVA PERSPECTIVE. The rethinking takes us to Native Americans on the California coast and their perspective of Thanksgiving. Today in part three, we learn the Thanksgiving perspective of the Gabrielino-Tongva people. Our location: Tongva Park in Santa Monica. (gabrielinotribe.org)

Rethinking Thanksgiving Part 4

by:,Reporter & Producer,Photographer, Editor, & Co-Producer Bob Keet ,Producer Jacob Mermell
Posted: Nov 12, 2021 / 04:12 PM PSTUpdated: Nov 18, 2021 / 02:25 PM PST
Gayle Anderson wraps up our four part series observing the 400th ANNIVERSARY OF THANKSGIVING AND RETHINKING THANKSGIVING IN NOVEMBER: NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH – NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE BEARER. The rethinking takes us to Native Americans on the California coast and their perspective of Thanksgiving. Today in part four, we learn the Thanksgiving perspective of the Native American Culture Bearer Christopher Martin Tadai Diaz.  (www.csulb.edu)

Rethinking Thanksgiving Part 5

by:,Reporter & Producer,Photographer, Editor, & Co-Producer Bob Keet ,Web Producer Danielle Pendleton
Posted: Nov 23, 2021 / 07:16 AM PSTUpdated: Nov 26, 2021 / 01:02 PM PST
Gayle Anderson is live in Encino, where we continue our month-long series of NOVEMBER IS NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH reports spotlighting the 400TH anniversary of Thanksgiving & Rethinking Thanksgiving with the Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians and their Tribal President Rudy Ortega, Jr.; his tribe’s history, his perspective of this – the 400th anniversary of Thanksgiving and what Thanksgiving means to him and his people.  
400th Anniversary of Thanksgiving / Rethinking Thanksgiving
Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians
Tribal Administration
1019 Second Street
San Fernando, CA 91340
818 837 0794
E-mail: administration@tataviam-nsn.us
tataviam-nsn.us

Rethinking Thanksgiving  - The Native American perspective 

If you have questions, please feel free to contact Gayle Anderson at 1-323-460-5732 or email at Gayle.Anderson@KTLA.com.
CSUDH American Indian Pow Wow
Held the third weekend in April, the pow wow, Honoring the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas, is tied to the service learning anthropology class North American Indians, and is led by the students themselves. After volunteering for the weekend, students state that working with Native people helps them understand contemporary Native American issues.
The 10th Annual Pow Wow will be held on November 20 virtually. (Click on photo)
For more information about the annual Pow Wow, contact the SLICE office at (310) 243-2438.
csudh-pow-wow-flyer-2019
Native American Indian Association
This student organization is open to all students interested in supporting Natives in our community. Events throughout the year include Native videos, field trips, regalia making, and social gatherings.
For more information, contact the SLICE office at (310) 243-2438.