Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

The study of Sociology offers students the opportunity to develop a critical understanding of social processes and structures, so as to be able to live and work in our diverse global society and to apply the tools of social analysis to a broad range of professional, academic and community situations. The methods and knowledge developed by sociologists reflect the complexity of human organization, social life, inequalities and social justice. The newly emerging patterns of social change continue to alter our life, making the effective applications of social analysis more important than ever before in solving problems of inequalities, human organization and justice at a local and global level.

The department of Sociology at CSUDH is committed to its mission of sociology in service to community. The department is composed of a diverse, innovative and stimulating faculty who teach and pursue research in a variety of areas that are important in today’s global societies. The sociology faculty offers undergraduate and graduate programs with several emphases that respond directly to the needs of today’s students. We offer a wide range of opportunities to engage in service learning, applied research and community studies and organizing.

Undergraduate majors and minors may concentrate their studies in a variety of areas including applied research, community studies, criminology and justice studies, the helping professions and social change in global context. Sociology prepares students for careers in social work, law, criminal justice, government, non-profit and community, and international organizations, education, gerontology, medicine, community service, urban planning, politics, business, academia, human resources and applied research.

Undergraduates majoring in sociology may elect to concentrate their studies in any of the areas mentioned above or in an area designed in consultation with faculty to best fit their academic or professional goals. Students majoring in other disciplines or professional programs may tailor a minor in sociology to complement their major field of study. A minor in Sociology complements a wide range of majors, including psychology, political science, computer science, liberal studies, human services, public administration and many others.

Undergraduate course offerings may be found by consulting the online school catalog for Sociology here.

The Sociology Department recommends that each student select an area for the major or minor. At least six elective courses should be taken from that chosen area of study (Upon consultation with an advisor a student may elect to substitute another course for one in their specialty)


The Basic Areas of Study are as follows:

  • Applied Research
  • Community Studies
  • Criminology and Justice Studies
  • Helping Professions
  • Social Change in Global Context
  • Social Inequalities

Applied Research

The applied research area emphasizes practical skills needed to conduct research projects in diverse social settings. Courses cover such topics as statistical analysis, research methods, feminist methods, program evaluation, and ethnographic data analysis. The goal of the area is to provide students with hands-on research experiences from a sociological perspective. Students will gain many of the technical skills needed to conduct community research, program evaluation, and data analysis. These skills are increasingly important in non-profit agencies as well as in large university and private research centers.

  • SOC 220. Analytical Statistics for Sociology
  • SOC 302. Workshop in Social Research
  • SOC 303. Qualitative Methods
  • SOC 304. Computer Applications in the Social Sciences
  • SOC 305. Methods of Sociological Research
  • SOC 306. Program Evaluation
  • SOC 408. Survey Research
  • SOC 503. Seminar in Ethnographic Analysis in Sociology (at instructor’s discretion)

Community Studies

The areas of community studies use multiple methodologies to explore social justice issues in diverse communities. It is designed to provide students with an overview of different approaches to the field. Classes address theories of community, issues in community studies, ethics, and data analysis. Many of the classes include practical fieldwork requirements such as internships, service learning, and research with community partners. This area will prepare students for careers in research, program evaluation, social work, non-profit management, urban planning, and public policy among others.

  • SOC 302. Workshop in Social Research
  • SOC 306. Program Evaluation
  • SOC 326. Sociology of Medicine
  • SOC 331. Minority Racial and Ethnic Relations SOC 334. Women in Society
  • SOC 335. Social Movements
  • SOC 340. Social Psychological: Sociological perspective
  • SOC 341. Seminar in Small Groups
  • SOC 362. Gangs and Adolescent Subcultures
  • SOC 363. Sociology of Alcohol and Other Drug Use
  • SOC 380. Urban Sociology
  • SOC 381: Field Study in Urban Problems
  • SOC 383. Black Communities, Class, Status and Power
  • SOC 384. Resistance, Inequality, and Communities
  • SOC 503. Seminar in Ethnography Analysis in Sociology (at instructor’s discretion)

Criminology and Justice Studies

This area of study utilizes a social scientific lens to examine various institutions associated with the criminal justice system. Specifically, this area explores criminology theories regarding the etiology of crime, juvenile delinquency, ganging, and deviant behavior as they relate to policing, courts, corrections, and laws. The courses will delve into issues such as social inequality and power relations between correctional institutions and communities. With an emphasis on social justice, this area will give students the tools to analyze these topics from feminist, global, critical race theory perspectives, preparing students for graduate school, law school, or government employment.

Additionally, students educated within a social justice framework are prepared to contribute to the justice professions through evaluation, research, ethical practice, and dedicated service.

  • SOC 331. Minority Racial and Ethnic Relations
  • SOC 362. Gangs and Adolescent Subcultures SOC 364. Corrections
  • SOC 365. Deviant Behavior
  • SOC 367. Sociology of the Law SOC 368. Criminology
  • SOC 369. Juvenile Delinquency SOC 380. Urban Sociology
  • SOC 381. Field Studies in Urban Problems

Helping Professions

This area of study looks at the social service resources in the community as they link up with the diverse populations in society. Community agencies provide social services, mental health services and health services as they interface with ethnic communities, the elderly and families from all walks of life. Understanding the theories of helping and the methods of service delivery become important in assessing the effectiveness of social agencies. Community fieldwork and hands-on experience at agencies provide the student with opportunities to view the function of these agencies and their purpose in serving communities.

  • SOC 306. Program Evaluation
  • SOC 316. Sociology of Adult Life and Aging
  • SOC 320. The Family
  • SOC 326. Sociology of Medicine
  • SOC 328. Social Agencies: Practice and Power
  • SOC 363. Sociology of Alcohol and Other Drug Use SOC 381. Field of Studies in Urban Problems
  • SOC 383: Black Communities, Resistance, and Change SOC 386: Sociology of the Helping Professions

Social Change in Global Contexts

This area of study focuses on the relationship between global processes (political, economic, and cultural) and social institutions and communities. Students will develop analytical skills that pertain to the changing social environments on a local, regional, and global level. This area highlights how collective and individual social factors shape and are shaped by the shifting conditions brought about by globalization. The goal of this area is to prepare students for further study in the area of global studies as well as careers in which knowledge of the global dimensions of social life are required. Topics included but are not limited to: the social impact of immigration, the environment, labor issues, race, gender, sexuality, ethnic, human rights, and new forms of citizenship and governance.

  • SOC 311. Global Organizations and Social Processes
  • SOC 321. Sociology of Education
  • SOC 315. Sociology of Work
  • SOC 326. Sociology of Medicine
  • SOC 334. Women in Society
  • SOC 335. Social Movements
  • SOC 384. Resistance, Inequality and Communities
  • SOC 387. Theory and Research in Globalization

Social Inequalities

This area of study focuses on forms of racial formation, the social construction of gender and inequality, class and domination and subordination. Students will develop the skills to critically understand the intersections of race, class, gender, sexualities, citizenship and inequalities that shape social lives. Furthermore, students will acquire an understanding of resistance and social movements aimed at addressing inequalities. The study of social inequalities prepares students for a wide range of careers where sensitivity to diversity and advocacy are called for.

  • SOC 311. Global Organizations and Social Processes
  • SOC 321. Sociology of Education
  • SOC 322. Sociology of Medicine
  • SOC 327. Sociology of Sports
  • SOC 331. Minority Ethnic Relations
  • SOC 334. Women in Sociology
  • SOC 335. Social Movements
  • SOC 362. Gangs and Adolescent Subcultures
  • SOC 383. Black Communities
  • SOC 384. Resistance, Inequalities and Communities

Major Requirements (39 units)

The following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, are required of all candidates for this degree.

A. Lower Division Required Courses (7 units)

CourseDescription
SOC 101The Individual in Society (3) or
SOC 102Understanding Social Relations in Global Perspective (3)
SOC 220Analytical Statistics for Soc. (4)

 

1. Required Courses (14 units)

CourseDescription
SOC 305Methods of Soc. Research (4)
SOC 311Global Organization & Soc. Processes (3)
SOC 340Soc. Psychology:  Soc. Perspectives (3)
SOC 355Modern Soc. Theories (4)

 

2. Electives (18 units): Select six additional upper division courses in Sociology with the assistance of an advisor.

Basic Areas of Study

The Sociology Department recommends that each student select an area for the major or minor. At least four elective courses should be taken from that chosen area of study (Upon consultation with an advisor a student may elect to substitute another course for one in his/her specialty).

Recommended areas of study are as follows:

  • Criminology and justice studies
  • Community studies
  • Social change in global context
  • Sociology of the helping professions
  • Social inequalities
  • Applied research

Minor in Sociology (15 units)

Five courses selected upon advisement (a maximum of three lower division units may apply toward the minor). The department also provides advisors who pay particular attention to the professional needs of students working in the technical, administrative and business fields. Minor areas may be “tailor-made” to meet the specific educational interests and career needs of students (see previous academic advisement section).